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SAFE Choices: Speakers Guidelines and Values

Review our SAFE Choices Speaker guidelines to make sure your presentation shares important information about the science of addiction and does not use stigmatizing language.

We want to make sure your presentation is the best it can be. In the next piece of our training, we will ask you to review our SAFE Choices Speaker guidelines to make sure your presentation shares important information about the science of addiction and does not use stigmatizing language. We also worked with the John Hopkins Medical Center Stigma Lab to identify ways to share elements your story in ways that ensure people hear your message. 

SAFE Choices Guidelines

 

Before your SAFE speaking engagement, you must review our Core Beliefs to familiarize yourself with SAFE’s beliefs and approach to ending the addiction epidemic

Introduce yourself and SAFE. First impressions are important! When preparing your presentation, we have some basic points about SAFE we need you to identify up front.

  • “Hi, my name is [Name] and I am a SAFE Choices Speaker from SAFE Project.
  • SAFE stands for Stop the Addiction Fatality Epidemic.
  • SAFE Project is a national nonprofit, but we work closely with communities to provide public awareness and prevention programming.
  • I’m here to talk about my experience…” and continue into your story.

Tell your story. Tell the audience how you were personally touched by addiction.

  • We use “Person First Language” when talking about substance use disorder.  That means someone’s condition, illness, or behavior is “only one aspect of who the person is, not the defining characteristic.” Simply put, that means we refer to the person first before any words describing their condition or behavior.

Incorporate the science of addiction into your presentation.

Close your presentation by directing the audience to share their story with SAFE Project.

  • Every presentation should leave the audience with a call to action, something they can do in reaction to the important story you have just shared. This call to action may be unique to your presentation depending on the story you tell. For example, maybe you want to call for people to put naloxone in their first aid kids, making it more likely that they will have it on hand when needed. But your call to action should also include an invitation for audience members to check out SAFE Project and share their own story. You can ask audience members to visit safeproject.us, or follow us on social media.

Complete the fields below to agree to the SAFE Choices Speaking Guidelines.